Seaforth Oval to Roseville Bridge via Bantry Bay
Guringai Country

3 h 15 min to 5 h

9.9 km
oneway

↑ 436 m
↓ -543 m

Hard track
Starting at Seaforth Oval, this walk follows a section of the 'Harbour to Hawkesbury' track along Middle Harbour Creek. The walk has many highlights, including great views of Bantry Bay, the Historic Magazine Buildings and the Natural Bridge. This walk is blessed with great bushland and views of Middle Harbour. Stop and relax, or wet your toes, at Flat Rock beach before the last section to Davidson Picnic Area. Let us begin by acknowledging the Guringai people, Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present. 
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Top of the Timber Getters Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Following the signposts. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Heading down the wooden steps. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Views of the magazine buildings from the side of the valley. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Winding down the hill. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Bantry Bay picnic area. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Bantry Bay picnic area wharf. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
The Bay Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
View of the magazine buildings. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Following the Bushtrack. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Passing cliffs. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Rock steps. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
View from the Bluff Lookout. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Following the Bluff Track service trail. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Following the track markers. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2007.
Heading down the side of the valley. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Following the rocky track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2007.
Crossing the Natural Bridge. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Continuing through the bush. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Natural Bridge Track steps. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Continuing through the bush. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Passing a large rock outcrop. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Crossing a small creek. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
The Magazine Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Heading along the side of the valley. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Following the fenceline behind the Magazine Buildings. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Looking down at the Magazine Buildings. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Passing the base of a short cliff. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Following the waters edge. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
View from Flatrock Beach. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
The Flat Rock Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Heading through the ferns. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Passing a private property. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Looking down on Middle Harbour Creek. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Following the Flat Rock Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
The Flat Rock Trackhead. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Heading into the picnic area. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Davidson Park. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Downloads GPX PDF

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Safer Bushwalks
Tips on staying safe on track
Before you start any bushwalk ensure you;
• Tell someone you trust where you are going and what to do if you are overdue
• Have adequate equipment, supplies, skills & knowledge for the whole journey
• Consider the impact of weather forecasts, park/track closures & fire dangers
• Can respond to emergencies & call for help at any point
• Are healthy and fit enough for this journey
If not, change plans and stay safe. It is okay to delay and ask people for help.
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Getting There
Transport options and directions
Start (-33.7819415,151.237195)
Mode Bus Car (There is free parking available.)
DirectionsFrom Manly Road, A8
  • Turn on to Sydney Road then drive for 275 m
  • At roundabout, take exit 3 onto Frenchs Forest Road and drive for another 2.6 km
Finish (-33.7688936,151.2039156)
Mode (end) Car Shuttle   Bus   Car   (A park entry fee is required for driving into the park.)
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Track Notes
Turn by turn instructions & maps
Getting started
From the corner of the car park with the information signs, the walk heads into the bush and down the wooden steps to the bottom, where it flattens out at the signposted intersection with the Engraving Track.....
Turn map Directions & comments
Start.
Find the car park at the start.
Find the Seaforth Oval at the start.
Seaforth Oval
Seaforth Oval

Seaforth Oval is a large playing oval on the Wakehurst Parkway in North Balgowlah. It is managed by Manly Council, who have also recently been upgrading the Timber Getters Track in association with NPWS. There is a distant view of Chatswood from the oval. There are toilets, but they are usually locked. There is a large car park, shelter and sign with information about the Harbour to Hawkesbury walk.
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Seaforth Oval is a large playing oval on the Wakehurst Parkway in North Balgowlah. It is managed by Manly Council, who have also recently been upgrading the Timber Getters Track in association with NPWS. There is a distant view of Chatswood from the oval. There are toilets, but they are usually locked. There is a large car park, shelter and sign with information about the Harbour to Hawkesbury walk.

Find the toilet at the start.
Find the water tap at the start.
Find the BBQ at the start.
Find the sign at the start.
After another 25 m veer left.
After another 110 m pass the sign.
Continue straight.
After another 345 m come to the viewpoint.
After another 350 m come to the viewpoint.
Then head down the steps (about 35 m long)
After another 6 m continue straight.
Then find the "Bantry Bay Picnic Area" (10 m on your left).
Bantry Bay Picnic Area
Bantry Bay Picnic Area

The area of Bantry Bay has been popular with day visitors since the late 1800s. In the early 1900s, the picnic area was also home to a dance hall (foundations still visible), dining room, picnic ground and overnight accommodation. Today, the picnic area has a picnic table and a number of fireplaces. There is also a public wharf, toilets, open grassy area, shade from trees and a great view across the water. There are no garbage facilities. The picnic area is at the bottom of the Timber Getters Track, below Seaforth Oval, on the eastern shore of Bantry Bay.
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The area of Bantry Bay has been popular with day visitors since the late 1800s. In the early 1900s, the picnic area was also home to a dance hall (foundations still visible), dining room, picnic ground and overnight accommodation. Today, the picnic area has a picnic table and a number of fireplaces. There is also a public wharf, toilets, open grassy area, shade from trees and a great view across the water. There are no garbage facilities. The picnic area is at the bottom of the Timber Getters Track, below Seaforth Oval, on the eastern shore of Bantry Bay.

After another 6 m pass the toilet (7 m on your right).
After another 720 m come to the viewpoint.
After another 930 m come to the viewpoint.
After another 55 m find the "Bluff Lookout" (5 m on your right).
Bluff Lookout
Bluff Lookout

The Bluff is a large, unfenced rocky hilltop, in Garigal National Park, that provides great views up Middle Harbour. The views extend across the bushland of the National Park, along Bantry Bay, to the city of Sydney (You can even see Centrepoint Tower). Apart from the distant views, the bluff is also an interesting rock feature, with a number of caves containing honeycomb rock formations.
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The Bluff is a large, unfenced rocky hilltop, in Garigal National Park, that provides great views up Middle Harbour. The views extend across the bushland of the National Park, along Bantry Bay, to the city of Sydney (You can even see Centrepoint Tower). Apart from the distant views, the bluff is also an interesting rock feature, with a number of caves containing honeycomb rock formations.

After another 50 m pass the sign.
After another 55 m continue straight.
After another 80 m continue straight.
After another 45 m continue straight.
After another 15 m pass the sign (on your left).
After another 45 m veer left.
After another 470 m find the "Natural Bridge" (on your left).
Natural Bridge
Natural Bridge

The Natural Bridge is a sandstone arch in Garigal National Park. The arch spans an unnamed creek feeding into Bantry Bay. The Natural Bridge track uses this arch to cross the creek, and is not always noticed by walkers as the surrounding vegetation hides the full view of the feature from the track. The arch has formed the eroding forces of water flowing down the creek. The arch provides an interesting natural feature to explore and enjoy.
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The Natural Bridge is a sandstone arch in Garigal National Park. The arch spans an unnamed creek feeding into Bantry Bay. The Natural Bridge track uses this arch to cross the creek, and is not always noticed by walkers as the surrounding vegetation hides the full view of the feature from the track. The arch has formed the eroding forces of water flowing down the creek. The arch provides an interesting natural feature to explore and enjoy.

After another 40 m continue straight.
After another 220 m turn left.
After another 185 m continue straight.
After another 1.5 km veer right.
After another 410 m find the "Bantry Bay Explosives Magazine complex" (30 m on your left).
Bantry Bay Explosives Magazine complex
Bantry Bay Explosives Magazine complex

The Magazine Buildings were the premier storage facility for merchants' explosives between 1915 and 1974. During this time, the carefully constructed building where crucial for the safe storage of explosives used for building public works such as the Sydney Harbour Bridge, and additionally used by the Australian Navy during World War II. There is currently no public access to the site, and the buildings are best viewed from across the water at Bantry Bay Picnic Area, or anywhere on the other side of Bantry Bay.
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The Magazine Buildings were the premier storage facility for merchants' explosives between 1915 and 1974. During this time, the carefully constructed building where crucial for the safe storage of explosives used for building public works such as the Sydney Harbour Bridge, and additionally used by the Australian Navy during World War II. There is currently no public access to the site, and the buildings are best viewed from across the water at Bantry Bay Picnic Area, or anywhere on the other side of Bantry Bay.

The starting point of an optional sidetrip. An optional side trip to Flat Rock Beach. To start this optional side trip turn left here. On returning from this side trip veer left when you get back to this intersection. Details below.
After another 1 km continue straight.
After another 60 m turn right.
Then head down the steps (about 130 m long)
After another 20 m turn right.
After another 800 m continue straight.
After another 800 m continue straight.
After another 380 m pass the car park (30 m on your left).
After another 305 m turn right.
After another 15 m continue straight.
After another 50 m veer left.
After another 430 m pass the picnic table (30 m on your left).
Then pass the shelter (80 m on your left).
After another 145 m come to the end.
About 20 m past the end is a toilet.

An optional side trip to Flat Rock Beach.
Turn map Directions & comments
Start.
Then head up the steps
After another 10 m come to the end.
About 55 m past the end is "Flat Rock Beach".
Flat Rock Beach
Flat Rock Beach

Flat Rock Beach is a small, south-facing beach on Middle Harbour, in Garigal National Park. The sand is deposited on a rock shelf that pokes through in places, forming interesting sculptures. The beach is frequented by walkers and boaters enjoying their day by the water. The beach can be accessed by a bush track from the end of Killarney Drive, Killarney Heights. Historically, the beach was a popular picnic area and serviced by a ferry in the early 1900's. Today, there are no facilities, but some shade is provided by the trees at the back of the beach.
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Flat Rock Beach is a small, south-facing beach on Middle Harbour, in Garigal National Park. The sand is deposited on a rock shelf that pokes through in places, forming interesting sculptures. The beach is frequented by walkers and boaters enjoying their day by the water. The beach can be accessed by a bush track from the end of Killarney Drive, Killarney Heights. Historically, the beach was a popular picnic area and serviced by a ferry in the early 1900's. Today, there are no facilities, but some shade is provided by the trees at the back of the beach.

Turn around and retrace your steps back the 10 m to the main route.
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Terrain
Know the Hills, grading & facilities

Seaforth Oval to Roseville Bridge via Bantry Bay


Grading
Class 4/6
Hard track
Length 9.9 km
Time 3 h 15 min to 5 h
Quality of track Formed track, with some branches and other obstacles (3/6)
Gradient Very steep (4/6)
Signage Directional signs along the way (3/6)
Infrastructure Limited facilities, not all cliffs are fenced (3/6)
Experience Required Some bushwalking experience recommended (3/6)
Weather Weather generally has little impact on safety (1/6)

Some facilities on route
Shelter: There is one 9.7 km from the start.

Toilet: There are 3 on route, on average they are 2.5 km apart with the largest gap of 9.1 km.


Order of key facilities on route
ItemFrom StartName & link to notes
Toilet
9 m[toilet]
Toilet
850 m[toilet]
Building
5.7 kmBantry Bay Explosives Magazine complex
Shelter
9.7 km[shelter]
Toilet
9.9 km[toilet]
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Articles
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