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Tasmania specific bushwalking discussion.

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Tasmania specific bushwalking discussion. Please avoid publishing details of access to sensitive areas with no tracks.
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Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Tue 06 Aug, 2019 12:26 pm

Well, that's an interesting way to totally twist the BBF's objections to the proposal, isn't it.
Someone needs to tweet back to the twits that the objections are not about bushwalkers, as bushwalkers already visit the area. "Bushwalkers" and "experience-seekers with lots of money who need formed tracks and fancy huts" are not synonymous.
And what relevance are the range's status and mining exploration license? We're objecting to the area being damaged, the same way we object to ongoing damage in the non-NP, non-TWWHA Tarkine.

Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Thu 26 Sep, 2019 9:46 am

'We Believe'

Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Thu 26 Sep, 2019 6:42 pm

I wonder how many people could be organised to 'dislike' this video on YouTube?
I'd be much happier if the west coast remained 'wild' as stated in the video

Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Thu 26 Sep, 2019 9:33 pm

How’s the brief mention of Tasmania’s aboriginal heritage which very quickly moves on to a very long string of words describing the European history of the area :roll:

Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Fri 27 Sep, 2019 12:39 pm

And a shot at 'future prospects'. The 20mil is 'up to 20 mil' and the Tyndalls section seems to have become a primary focus. They're only about bullying 'greenies', this mob.

Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Fri 17 Jan, 2020 8:42 am

I'm wondering if there has been any news regarding the walk route?, touched on in this sweeping interview with Jen Fry @ 22.20 (which itself is interesting insight to park tourism if you have the time): https://player.fm/series/talking-touris ... th-jen-fry

It strikes me, throughout the interview how we are making the choice to populate parks (many of the new works are proactive to this choice) but even from a governance or management perspective, nobody really knows why (especially stark for anyone visiting Cradle Mt. recently.. Why would you?? Invariably they ask themselves when it's too late, overwhelmingly the question comes up 'What is there to do here', next we'll need to further develop interesting things to do..).

Out in parks we harden tracks, which is good because braiding has a chance to recover, and it's easier for more people/ different types of people, to walk further into the wilderness, to gnarly un-tracked places .. :?

Sure, there's money circulating. Our fat cats may help lift some work visa countries from poverty.., and there'll be more important seeming jobs for public servants to direct tourists around, hopefully keep some semblance of control.. (not for Jen, she's off to the fish farms :) )..

Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Sun 02 Feb, 2020 6:22 pm

Quite apart from my misgivings about inviting the hoards into such a fragile place, I don’t really understand the Tyndalls as a choice for a paying/hut based walk. Yes, it’s undeniably beautiful but the weather is also undeniably rubbish a lot of the time. The plateau is surely a lot more exposed than a lot of other tracked walks. Look at the rescues that seem to occur on the overland with monotonous regularity. Plus, I just don’t think the type of walker this is aimed wants to endure those conditions.
Perhaps, the government is banking on climate change to improve the weather.
While I understand that the West Coast seems to be in pretty dire straits financially, I’m not convinced this will really help anyway.

Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Fri 28 Feb, 2020 10:51 pm

You’re completely right Hermione. It’s like spending two full days walking across the cirque on the Overland Track - and that is not a pleasant place to be on an angry day (which is quite common - even more so on the Tyndall’s!). It’s actually one of the strongest ticks for the Trans-Tarkine proposal - that most of it traverses more sheltered and lower elevated environments. Any consultation with bushwalkers should give the government the same response - so it makes you wonder who they have putting together these ideas in the first place. If they could simply let go of the anti-green and anti-bob brown stigma, I think a very classy product could be produced on the west coast where it is definitely much needed.

Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Wed 02 Sep, 2020 10:38 am

'State of Play':

https://tnpa.org.au/tyndall-range-next- ... -WItmdxuns

Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Wed 02 Sep, 2020 10:54 am

" ... the “conceptual route” being considered had evolved to a single through-route corridor from the Anthony Highway near Lake Plimsoll to Lake Margaret, via Glacier Valley and Lake Huntley, then onwards south through the cluster of male-named 'M' lakes, then female-named 'M' lakes, and northwest of Lake Margaret. Up to four potential huts sites were indicated, one being Lake Huntley. The 'market research' is supposedly testing whether a 1, 2 or even 3-night model is most attractive."

Finishing at Margaret is a good idea. Withholding judgment until we get a map of the route. But how could you possibly drag that out into a 3 night walk? On a good track even doddery old me could do that in a day and half easily.

Re: Have your say on Tassie’s next iconic multi-day walk

Wed 02 Sep, 2020 11:52 am

Yeah, it seems a waste to make such a big investment, a proposal that a basic low-level track and a single campsite would serve.
'Designed for politics', a pragmatic approach it seems would better focus on using the existing infrastructure and highlights, the many lakes and varying environs. Maybe not even a focus on walking a long way.. 'Next Iconic smart use of resources'.

Anyway.. I reckon the view from many points north of Lk Margaret is awesome enough (without needing to climb much higher).
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