DCF Tarp MLD Monk Inspired.

Discussion about making bushwalking-related equipment.

DCF Tarp MLD Monk Inspired.

Postby AlistairB » Sun 28 Oct, 2018 8:05 pm

Hi folks.

I wanted a compact tarp for shorter trips were good weather is generally expected. Something to keep showers off and provide some shelter from the wind. I had my eye on the MLD Monk Tarp https://mountainlaureldesigns.com/product/monk-flat-tarp/ but with an 8 week lead time, and another $40 USD to ship to Australia (in addition to the $160USD RRP) I decided to try and make it myself. I also wanted it in white rather than green.

For anyone who wants to dip their toe into the MYOG cuben space this is a really good project to start with. Its just a 3 yard length of fabric, hemmed with tie outs. Super easy.

The tarp is .5 White DCF with the tie out reinforcement circles in White 2.92 DCF. The tie outs are nylon grosgrain ribbon with lineloc 3's on all tie outs except for a Beastee Dee for the trekking pole. I wanted the 2.92 as it would provide a really strong tie out point and wouldn't / shouldn't rip.

Tarp weight with 6 Lineloc's and 1 Beastee Dee is 95grams. With my guy ropes (which are 5 X 4ft lengths and 1 X 8 ft length) is 131grams. I'm using a Locus CP3 carbon trekking pole and 6 X MSR mini groundhogs for pitching. I only have 6 tie out points at the moment but will probably add a couple more. Even with the 6 you get a really nice tight pitch and its surprisingly roomy. Plenty of space to sit up in the middle.

You can see photos here: https://imgur.com/a/war4GEA

Tools required are a roller cutter, ruler and sewing machine (or needle and thread) - there is minimal sewing. You could easily hand-sew the tie outs.

Costs: The main cost is the .5DCF. This was $32 per yard from Ripstopbytheroll. They have coupons that give you 10% off so it was actually only $28.8USD per yard. I used a tiny amount of my half yard of 2.92. Maybe 10cms. The remainder is going into ditty bags and packing cubes as another MYOG project. Apart from those, it's about 6 yards of double-sided tape, linelocs, a beastee dee and some thread. Including shipping, but not including the remainder of the 2.92 I'm using for other projects, i think this cost just under $140 AUD. Not a massive saving but I got the colour i wanted, some added features and it was actually a lot of fun. I'm really happy with the result. Oh and it took a couple of hours at nights but I think I could get it down to about an hour if I made another.

Steps:
1. Trim the selvedge and square up the ends of the main .5DCF sheet. The DCF has a few centimetres on each side running the length that isn't useable. Its just a plastic filmy strip. Chop it off. I used a roller-cutter ($8 from Lincraft) and a ruler.

2. Hem the edges. Starting with the two long sides I attached 1/2 inch double sided bonding tape to the edge of the fabric. I then folded the DCF over and inwards the width of the tape to create the hem. No sewing required. Some care is needed though as the tape is very sticky and it can kind of bunch and crease in places. Slow and steady is the key. After the two long sides are done, do it for the width hems. All four sides should now have a 1/2 inch double layer of .5DCF on the edge.

3. Find a good sized cup in the kitchen and trace circles onto your 2.92 DCF. Cut these out with your rollercutter. For the corners you need a bigger cup as you'll only use half the circle (cut two circles total). Use a smaller full circle for the side tie outs. I only have 2 of those so far but I might add some more.

4. On the shiny side of the 2.92 DCF. Stick on the double sides tape, trimming to keep it a neat. Stick half of your 2.92 cutout to one side of the tarp and then fold the other side around to sandwich the .5 dcf between the 2.92. This results in a reinforcement of 2 X 2.92 DCF and if its over the seam, 2 X layers of .5 DCF. Nice and tough.

5. Cut your lengths of grosgrain. Thread on your linelok / beastee dee. To make it neat I folded the ends of the grosgrain back in on themselves so the grosgrain ends where sandwiched inside the grosgrain. Carefully stitch this onto your tie out areas. I put two bar stitches, one at the top and one over .5dcf hem towards the bottom.

6. The Beastee Dee was a fraction small for my trekking pole tip so I got some sandpaper, rolled it up into a pencil and slowly enlarged the size of the hole to snugly fit my trekking pole. It locks in nicely now.

7. Thats it! You're done!. Cut you guys ropes and pitch away.
AlistairB
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Re: DCF Tarp MLD Monk Inspired.

Postby Rosscodj » Mon 29 Oct, 2018 8:36 am

I'm impressed. This is something I've been thinking about. I actually have a sil Monk from a couple of years back. Might just be a project for the Uni break. Thanks for sharing!
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Re: DCF Tarp MLD Monk Inspired.

Postby AlistairB » Mon 29 Oct, 2018 9:56 am

Rosscodj wrote:I'm impressed. This is something I've been thinking about. I actually have a sil Monk from a couple of years back. Might just be a project for the Uni break. Thanks for sharing!


Thanks :-) The November Black Friday sales are a good time to pick up materials. Most DIY gear sellers do a 15% off coupon.
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Re: DCF Tarp MLD Monk Inspired.

Postby Rosscodj » Mon 29 Oct, 2018 2:53 pm

That's actually a really good point. I'll keep an eye out. Cheers!
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