Best fabric for a day pack for home

Discussion about making bushwalking-related equipment.

Best fabric for a day pack for home

Postby Lophophaps » Fri 29 Jun, 2018 4:54 pm

Until now I've used canvas for my day packs when at home, going to the shops and the like. The canvas has lasted very well. There's now other fabrics that are just as durable if not more so, and lighter. Can anyone advise what fabrics are best and how these should be described? I need to look at catalogues. I'm also after sources. Tier Gear is an obvious place to start. TIA.
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Re: Best fabric for a day pack for home

Postby simonm » Fri 29 Jun, 2018 6:52 pm

Just to let you know we have ceased supplying DIY materials to focus on other areas of our business, though we can still supply some materials if asked nicely.
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Re: Best fabric for a day pack for home

Postby ofuros » Fri 29 Jun, 2018 7:47 pm

Just for starters...Although the Aussie/US exchange rate isn't that flash at the moment. :wink:

https://ripstopbytheroll.com/collections/pack-fabric

https://dutchwaregear.com/product/210d-pack-material/

Will be modifying a cheap Mytrail outdated design(copy of the 50litre golite jam) to suit my needs, using the 210d material from dutch, replacing the heavy flexy back support with a couple of lightweight carbon fibre struts...just have to sew in a couple of slim strut pockets with a Velcro tab over the top to keep them in place.

Since the back is coming off, will also replace the the fine mesh side pockets since they won't last long off-track. Maybe a tailored pocket for my hydration bladder to reduce any fluid movement by replacing the flexy mesh.
The more I think about it....instead of modifying, maybe I should build one from the ground up. :roll:
Last edited by ofuros on Sat 30 Jun, 2018 8:29 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Best fabric for a day pack for home

Postby ofuros » Fri 29 Jun, 2018 8:15 pm

Mountains view are good for my soul...& getting to them is good for my waistline !
https://ofuros.exposure.co/
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Re: Best fabric for a day pack for home

Postby Lophophaps » Sat 30 Jun, 2018 10:45 am

Thanks. I'm still uncertain about what sort of fabrics are best. Is there a range of denier and weight that is suitable? These Australian companies may have suitable fabric.
http://bradmilloutdoor.com.au/
http://www.brucktextiles.com.au/
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Re: Best fabric for a day pack for home

Postby ofuros » Sat 30 Jun, 2018 8:47 pm

You can always check out your favourite backpack manufacturers website....they usually have the material specs, just find something similar, locally.

Eg : -
Exped lighting....210 denier dyneema gridstop nylon, pu coated.
Macpac voyager...630 denier cordura nylon
Osprey manta...210D High Tenacity Nylon
One planet zipless...waterloc canvas 390gsm
Mont swift...DR80 canvas
Gossamer gear gorilla...70denier Robic ripstop nylon

Etc etc
Last edited by ofuros on Mon 02 Jul, 2018 4:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
Mountains view are good for my soul...& getting to them is good for my waistline !
https://ofuros.exposure.co/
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Re: Best fabric for a day pack for home

Postby Warin » Sat 30 Jun, 2018 9:05 pm

Durable ..
I have a fairly old pair of bicycle panniers.
They are made out of cordura. But they have a canvas bottom on them inside the cordura. The cordura has some ware holes in it.. the steel hooks that fasten it to the bicycle have some ware on them .. They are well used. If I were to obtain another set of panniers to last the same I'd buy another set of these. Unfortunately the manufacture does not make these any more .. possibly no repeat sales?
If your old canvas backpack did the job and you want something at least as good .. consider duplicating it. If you substitute modern materials be aware they will change how it performs.

Something not mentioned so far are 'ballistic' materials - designed for high abrasion resistance.. if your old pack has wear holes in it then this material may do.
Good Luck.
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Re: Best fabric for a day pack for home

Postby Lophophaps » Sat 30 Jun, 2018 9:35 pm

Checking the manufacturer's websites is a good idea, thanks. I'll do that and then see what the fabric is like in the shops. I have old panniers as well, also had holes where the metal abraded the fabric. They were repaired using flexible glue and old day pack off-cuts. The day packs were of a low quality; one had 11 zips, horrible, and was rescued from a bin. This may be an option for repairing the ones cited above. I'm quite happy with canvas but want to consider all options. Ballistic material is tough but quite hard to work with scissors and to a lesser extent needles.
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Re: Best fabric for a day pack for home

Postby Warin » Sat 30 Jun, 2018 9:46 pm

Lophophaps wrote:Ballistic material is tough but quite hard to work with scissors


The ambos don't use scissors for motorcycle riders ... they use 'shears' that will cut through light metal and leather boots. I have a pair in the first aid kit. I should get several more .. they are reasonably cheap so the ambos throw them away after using them on the tough stuff like kevlar. Might be avalible from St John. They look like scissors but with corrugated edges.

Arr here you go 'trama shears' $7 each.. https://priorityfirstaid.com.au/trauma- ... gJ3ifD_BwE (humm AEDs have come down used to be $5k now $2k ..)
I'd still try St. John.
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